Don't let your baby nap in the car seat after you're home as a substitute for crib since it's harder for young babies to breathe in that position. ||Set aside time for your partner and share what's happening in each other's life ||Ask your baby's doctor about vitamin D supplements for the baby, especially if you're breast-feeding ||The most important thing on growth curves is how your baby grows over time. If he's small but growing at the appropriate rate, there's usually no cause for concern. ||Put a photo of a face – yours – on the side of the cot for your baby to look at. Human faces fascinate babies ||Presumably, your baby won't recall events from his life before age 3. Still, these early experiences outline his vision of the world ||Reading aloud will help your baby be a better reader when she's older. ||Don’t forget to put labels with date and time on your expressed milk bottles to check expiry dates ||After the first hectic weeks, babies take longer naps at predictable times. And you'll become a much better time manager ||Design a kid corner and fill it with things safe for your toddler like Tupperware, toys, empty boxes, etc. ||
Baby Guide
Can my baby recognize himself in the mirror?

 

The first time he smiles at himself in the mirror, he's probably just reacting to seeing a happy face. But as time goes on, he'll figure out that this is his own face. This is a sign that your baby starts the recognition of himself as a separate entity in the world.
 
In one experiment in the late seventies, researchers asked a group of mothers and their babies, ages 9 to 24 months, to play in front of a mirror. First, the researchers watched to see how each baby acted when placed in front of a mirror. Next, each of the mothers pretended to wipe dirt off her baby’s face—but they were really putting a small bit of red makeup on the tip of the baby’s nose. Then the babies were placed in front of the mirror again, to see what they would do.
 
Before they’re 15 months old, babies don’t seem to recognize themselves in the mirror. These babies stared at their reflections and may have found them familiar, but they didn’t react any differently when they saw the red spots on their noses. But by 21 months, most infants tried to touch or wipe their nose. Researchers also studied children’s self-awareness as a way to learn about emotions such as embarrassment. The children who touched their red noses in the mirror were the only ones who showed embarrassment. Those who didn’t touch their noses did not show signs of being embarrassed.
 
Parenting tips
  • Be caring and responsive to your child as he may not understand what he’s feeling. Support all of his emotions.
  • Don’t dismiss their emotions no matter how minor the situation.
  • Be a good listener and get down to his level and let him know you care.
  • Help your child by naming new emotions and teaching healthy ways to deal with them.
  • Some children might find embarrassing situations fun, while others will be very uncomfortable. If your child gets embarrassed easily and is uncomfortable, redirect him to another activity, toy, or room.
 
 
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