As a new mommy, sleep when your baby sleeps. Silence your phone and ignore the dishes in the sink ||It’s never too early to read for your child ||If your child's scalp is very crusty, put some baby oil or olive oil on the scalp 1 hour before washing to soften the crust ||Stop the continuous criticism to your teens. Highlight their qualities instead. ||Plan for regular family meals. Enjoy being together as a family and give a chance for everyone to decompress from the day ||After the first hectic weeks, babies take longer naps at predictable times. And you'll become a much better time manager ||Breastfeeding releases Oxytocin which causes contractions of the uterus, helping to stop hemorrhage and initiating weight loss ||Whenever possible, don't get involved in your kids' clash. Step in only if there's a danger of physical harm. ||Make sure your baby wears a hat if she will be in a cold environment ||When giving suspension or liquid medicines, use the dosage cup enclosed in the package or a syringe ||
Stuttering Facts

 

What is stuttering?

Stuttering is a disorder that affects the fluency of speech. People who stutter know what they want to say, but have trouble saying it because the flow of their speech is disrupted by any of these behaviours:

  • Repeating sounds, words or phrases (eg. I I I I I can do it)
  • Prolonging sounds (eg. Where's my sssssister?)
  • Blocking; moments where no sounds come out when the person is trying to speak.

People who stutter may also develop non-verbal movements associated with their stutter (eg. head movements, blinking, and facial grimacing).

Facts about stuttering

  • Most children begin stuttering between the ages of 2 and 5 years, when speech and language is developing.
  • The onset of stuttering may be sudden or gradual.
  • About 5% of children stutter at some stage. Many children go through a stage of stuttering as their speech and language develops. Research indicates that, of these children about half may recover naturally, but for others the stutter will persist.
  • Stuttering is about 3 times more common in boys.
  • Stuttering can vary in severity over time, and even throughout a day.
  • Stuttering affects speakers of all languages and backgrounds.
  • A child may stutter more when talking about a new topic or if using complicated language.

Other factors can affect stuttering. For example, a child who is already stuttering may stutter more when excited, tired, arguing, given limited time to speak, competing to be heard, or speaking to someone new. Some children who stutter may feel anxious talking. They may avoid speaking in particular situations (eg. on the telephone), using certain words, or speaking with some people.

When Should I Seek Professional Help for My Child's Stuttering?

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