Reflux is common in newborns. Most babies outgrow reflux between the time they are 1 and 2 years old ||There are parenting mistakes that are harmless. When in doubt, ask your pediatrician ||If you have trouble emptying your breast, apply warm compresses to the breast or take a warm shower before breast-feeding ||Reading aloud will help your baby be a better reader when she's older ||Try to keep other elements of your baby's routine as normal as possible during the strike. ||There are some games, that you can play with your child to increase his ability to concentrate. Check them out in our articles section. ||The pacifier’s guard or shield should have ventilation holes so the baby can breathe if the shield does get into the mouth ||The AAP recommends sponge baths until the umbilical cord stump falls off — which might take up to three weeks ||After the first hectic weeks, babies take longer naps at predictable times. And you'll become a much better time manager ||Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months is the best prevention of food allergies ||
Stuttering Facts

 

What is stuttering?

Stuttering is a disorder that affects the fluency of speech. People who stutter know what they want to say, but have trouble saying it because the flow of their speech is disrupted by any of these behaviours:

  • Repeating sounds, words or phrases (eg. I I I I I can do it)
  • Prolonging sounds (eg. Where's my sssssister?)
  • Blocking; moments where no sounds come out when the person is trying to speak.

People who stutter may also develop non-verbal movements associated with their stutter (eg. head movements, blinking, and facial grimacing).

Facts about stuttering

  • Most children begin stuttering between the ages of 2 and 5 years, when speech and language is developing.
  • The onset of stuttering may be sudden or gradual.
  • About 5% of children stutter at some stage. Many children go through a stage of stuttering as their speech and language develops. Research indicates that, of these children about half may recover naturally, but for others the stutter will persist.
  • Stuttering is about 3 times more common in boys.
  • Stuttering can vary in severity over time, and even throughout a day.
  • Stuttering affects speakers of all languages and backgrounds.
  • A child may stutter more when talking about a new topic or if using complicated language.

Other factors can affect stuttering. For example, a child who is already stuttering may stutter more when excited, tired, arguing, given limited time to speak, competing to be heard, or speaking to someone new. Some children who stutter may feel anxious talking. They may avoid speaking in particular situations (eg. on the telephone), using certain words, or speaking with some people.

When Should I Seek Professional Help for My Child's Stuttering?

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