Reading aloud will help your baby be a better reader when she's older. ||Don't let your baby nap in the car seat after you're home as a substitute for crib since it's harder for young babies to breathe in that position. ||Make sure your baby wears a hat if she will be in a cold environment ||There are some games, that you can play with your child to increase his ability to concentrate. Check them out in our articles section. ||In case of eczema, use mild, unscented body and laundry soaps. Pat baby's skin dry; don't rub ||Set aside time for your partner and share what's happening in each other's life ||To help your kid stand up to negative peer pressure, encourage him to talk, use role playing with him, get to know the parents of your child's friends and finally deal with your own peer pressure. ||Massaging infants' arms and hands can significantly reduce their pain from needle sticks ||Toddler's appetite may change almost daily. Let her be the judge of how much she needs and wants to eat. ||Sleep sacks and sufficient layers of clothing are safe alternatives to blankets for children less than six months of age ||
Stuttering Facts


What is stuttering?

Stuttering is a disorder that affects the fluency of speech. People who stutter know what they want to say, but have trouble saying it because the flow of their speech is disrupted by any of these behaviours:

  • Repeating sounds, words or phrases (eg. I I I I I can do it)
  • Prolonging sounds (eg. Where's my sssssister?)
  • Blocking; moments where no sounds come out when the person is trying to speak.

People who stutter may also develop non-verbal movements associated with their stutter (eg. head movements, blinking, and facial grimacing).

Facts about stuttering

  • Most children begin stuttering between the ages of 2 and 5 years, when speech and language is developing.
  • The onset of stuttering may be sudden or gradual.
  • About 5% of children stutter at some stage. Many children go through a stage of stuttering as their speech and language develops. Research indicates that, of these children about half may recover naturally, but for others the stutter will persist.
  • Stuttering is about 3 times more common in boys.
  • Stuttering can vary in severity over time, and even throughout a day.
  • Stuttering affects speakers of all languages and backgrounds.
  • A child may stutter more when talking about a new topic or if using complicated language.

Other factors can affect stuttering. For example, a child who is already stuttering may stutter more when excited, tired, arguing, given limited time to speak, competing to be heard, or speaking to someone new. Some children who stutter may feel anxious talking. They may avoid speaking in particular situations (eg. on the telephone), using certain words, or speaking with some people.

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