To help your kid stand up to negative peer pressure, encourage him to talk, use role playing with him, get to know the parents of your child's friends and finally deal with your own peer pressure. ||Don't forget to watch what you say and do around your child: Imitation is one of the ways toddlers learn socially acceptable behavior. ||During growth spurts - around 6 weeks after birth — your newborn might want to be fed more often ||Bathe baby for no more than ten minutes in warm water especially if he shows signs of skin eczema. ||Make sure the highchair has a wide base, good fit, adjustable secure straps. Consider a post between the child's legs. ||Every milestone is an accomplishment, but it means your child is more independent and needs you a little less ||A great deal of body heat is lost through a bare head, so make sure your baby wears a hat if she will be in a cold environment ||If every feeding is painful or your baby isn't gaining weight, ask a lactation consultant or your baby's doctor for help ||Ask your baby's doctor about vitamin D supplements for the baby, especially if you're breast-feeding ||Exclusive breastfeeding for at least 6 months is the best prevention of food allergies ||
Food Allergy

A food allergy happens when the body reacts against harmless proteins found in foods. The reaction usually happens shortly after a food is eaten. Food allergy reactions can vary from mild to severe. Because there are many things that can be confused with food allergies, it is important for parents to know the difference.


Symptoms of a food allergy


Skin problems

  • Hives (red spots that look like mosquito bites)
  • Itchy skin rashes (eczema, also called atopic dermatitis)
  • Swelling
  • Breathing problems
  • Sneezing
  • Wheezing
  • Throat tightness

Stomach symptoms

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Circulation symptoms
  • Pale skin
  • Light-headedness
  • Loss of consciousness

If several areas of the body are affected, the reaction may be severe or even life-threatening. This type of allergic reaction is called anaphylaxis and requires immediate medical attention.


Not a food allergy


Food can cause many illnesses that are sometimes confused with food allergies. The following are not food allergies:

Food poisoning—can cause diarrhea or vomiting, but is usually caused by bacteria in spoiled food or undercooked food.

Drug effects—certain ingredients, such as caffeine in soda or candy, can make your child shaky or restless.

Skin irritation—can often be caused by acids found in such foods as orange juice or tomato products.

Diarrhea—can occur in small children from too much sugar, such as from fruit juices.


Some food-related illnesses are called intolerance, or food sensitivity, rather than an allergy because the immune system is not causing the problem. Lactose intolerance is an example of a food intolerance that is often confused with a food allergy. Lactose intolerance is when a person has trouble digesting milk sugar, called lactose, leading to stomachaches, bloating, and loose stools.


Sometimes reactions to the chemicals added to foods, such as dyes or preservatives, are mistaken for a food allergy. However, while some people may be sensitive to certain food additives, it is rare to be allergic to them.


Foods that can cause food allergies

Any food could cause a food allergy, but most food allergies are caused by the following:

  • Cow milk
  • Eggs
  • Peanuts
  • Soy
  • Wheat
  • Nuts from trees (such as walnuts, pistachios, pecans, cashew)
  • Fish (such as tuna, salmon, cod)
  • Shellfish (such as shrimp, lobster)
  • Peanuts, nuts, and seafood are the most common causes of severe reactions. Allergies also occur to other foods such as meats, fruits, vegetables, grains, and seeds such as sesame.

The good news is that food allergies are often outgrown during early childhood. It is estimated that 80% to 90% of egg, milk, wheat, and soy allergies go away by age 5 years. Some allergies are more persistent. For example, 1 in 5 young children will outgrow a peanut allergy and fewer will outgrow allergies to nuts or seafood. Your pediatrician or allergist can perform tests to track your child's food allergies and watch to see if they are going away.

Home Visit Service

Your Baby checkup

Is my child developing normally?
what are the vaccinations that he should have taken until now?
Generate a report for my baby.
Birthdate *

Track Your Baby Vaccinations

Receive reminders by email for the Vaccination timing
Baby Name *
Email *
Birthdate *

Find Your Baby name

Visit our Clinics


Address View Map
21 Batal Ahmed Abdel Aziz St, 3rd floor





Beverly Hills

Address View Map
Beverly Hills, Building 29 services, behind Super Market Al Mokhtar, floor 1.




El Tagamo3

Address View Map
Tagamo3, Silver star mall, first floor,



Al Sheikh Zayed

Address View Map
Al Sheikh Zayed - Entrance 2,Downtown Mall - In-front of Spectra ,First Floor - Clinic 113


02- 38514031


Please enter your e-mail